The right to protest in the COVID-19 era: The case of Greece

The right to protest in the COVID-19 era: The case of Greece

By Evangelia Romanou

Source: AP news

The outbreak of the pandemic has certainly turned our daily lives upside down and we have witnessed a great number of our freedoms and fundamental rights being limited or even banned. Among the rights that have had serious and, in some cases, unjustifiable restrictions, is the right to protest, which consists of the right to freedom of association, peaceful assembly and expression. This article aims to examine the proportionality of the measures adopted by the Greek Government for the protection of public health, associated to the right to protest. More...

Doctoral Research Forum Blog Series: Part II

'On the brink of a catastrophic moral failure' - not the time to abandon international law

by David Patterson
source: by focusonmore.com via ccsearch

In January 2021 the Director-General of the World Health Organization, Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, delivered a blunt message at the opening of the 148th session of the WHO Executive Board: ‘The world is on the brink of a catastrophic moral failure – and the price of this failure will be paid with the lives and livelihoods of the world’s poorest countries.’ Dr Tedros was referring to the rich countries’ decision to prioritize COVID-19 vaccine access for their own younger, healthier adults over health workers and older people in poorer countries. He further stated, ‘Vaccine equity is not just a moral imperative, it is a strategic and economic imperative.’ These points are well-taken – a world divided between the COVID-19 vaccine ‘haves and have-nots’ will likely be less safe and less economically secure and productive. More...

Doctoral Research Forum Blog Series: Introduction

Doctoral Research Forum Blog Series: Introduction

by Stephanie Triefus
Source: Shutterstock
In February 2021, eighteen PhD researchers based around the Netherlands gathered online to share their research. Despite the inevitable ‘Zoom fatigue’ faced by all after nearly 12 months of pandemic living, these diligent researchers dedicated a colossal two full days of screen time to supporting their colleagues, listening intently to one another’s presentations and asking insightful questions. They were joined by several senior members of the Network, who provided their wise reflections on the topics discussed while gently and genially pushing the participants onwards in their research journeys. Participants reported that the Forum provided ‘useful feedback, a safe environment and inspiration’ in an otherwise isolating time. This blog series details the research of some of these participants, and covers a wide range of current topics related to human rights. 

Human rights is a marathon

Interview with Nils Muižnieks

for

International Human Rights Day 2020

Part I

By Silan Celebi and Felisa Tibbitts

 

The current Regional Director for Europe of Amnesty International, Nils Muižnieks, joins Human Rights Here in an insightful interview for Human Rights Day. He has a message for human rights academics and workers everywhere: “keep learning, get out of your comfort zone, take care of your health – human rights is a marathon, not a sprint.”

Nils Muižnieks is a Latvian-American political scientist and human rights expert. He lives an inspired life with numerous milestones to share, from being elected as the Commissioner for Human Rights of the Council of Europe, to becoming the Regional Director of Amnesty International. Muižnieks has over twenty-five years of experience in various intergovernmental organizations, government and academia. For Nils, working for human rights is the most meaningful thing you can do in your professional life, “I always like myself best when I am doing human rights work, it is the best me.”  

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Listen to children and young people to make their rights reality

Source: Étienne Godiard via Unsplash

Interview with Majorie Kaandorp, UNICEF Netherlands on the occasion of

World Children's Day 2020

By Janna Beijers & Stephanie Rap

 

Can you explain what you do at UNICEF NL? What is your central focus/passion in your work?

Currently, I am the manager of a team that focuses on a number of themes concerning children's rights in the Netherlands. This includes the mental well-being of teenagers, the implementation of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child in the Netherlands, i.e. NGO reporting to the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child,  and on migration and refugees. We also look at the impact of the corona crisis on children. Education and participation specialists who create educational material on children’s rights and organise participation projects are also part of the team.

In May this year UNICEF published a report about the impact of the Covid-19 crisis in the Netherlands. What were the most important impacts you found?

We drafted this report in cooperation with Leiden University. Within this report we looked at several critical points that were influenced by Covid-19: poverty, violence, education, migration, mental health, youth care, youth criminal law, and the situation on the Dutch Caribbean islands.

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Assessing India’s Response to Surge in Domestic Violence Cases Amidst COVID-19 Lockdown

 Source: Pixabay

Manvi Khanna

National Law University Odisha, Cuttack

https://www.linkedin.com/in/manvi-khanna-6a960815b/

In the midst of the ongoing COVID-19 crisis, the surge in cases of gender-based violence globally is another shadow pandemic and public health emergency that requires intervention by governments across the world. Nationwide lockdowns imposed as a containment measure have forced people to stay indoors for their safety as well as that of others. Unfortunately, homes are not the safest places for victims of domestic violence. Every third woman in the world has been physically abused by her spouse/partner. As per the recent statistics, during the 68 day period of lockdown (25 March 2020 to 31 May 2020) in India, 1477 complaints were made to the National Commission for Women, which is the highest number of complaints recorded during the similar time period in the last ten years, keeping in mind the fact that around 77% of the cases in the country go unreported.

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Contact tracing application vis à vis digital rights in a COVID-19 India


Source: iXimus - Pixabay

Ritwik Prakash Srivastava

National Law Institute University, Bhopal, India

ritwiksrivastava.ug@nliu.ac.in

In the wake of COVID-19, the Indian government launched and mandated the use of a contact-tracing application, Aarogya Setu (smart phone application). The Indian Prime Minister, Narendra Modi, in his address to the nation on 14 April 2020, urged the citizens to download the application to supplement the State’s struggle against the contagion. What started as a voluntary step, was first made mandatory for employees of the public and even the private sector, and then for entire districts. Failure to do so gives rise to a criminal penalty.

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Tackling violence against women in the Netherlands: some thoughts on the GREVIO baseline report on the Netherlands


Photo credits: Anthony Tran - Unsplash

Adriana van Dooijeweert

President, Netherlands Institute for Human Rights

Introduction

Just like everywhere in the world, also in the Netherlands violence against women is a widespread and serious problem. The Netherlands Institute for Human Rights (the Dutch national human rights institution) has had this issue on the agenda since its establishment. It has, for example, encouraged the Netherlands to ratify the Council of Europe Convention on Preventing and Combating Violence against Women and Domestic Violence (Istanbul Convention) and discussed with Dutch government officials and professionals, on various occasions, the human rights aspects of violence against women.

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